2015 Hyundai 4S Fluidic Verna Vs Honda City

Friday 20 February 2015, 12:12 PM by

When you are craving for a comfortable seating, capacious interiors and a smooth ride on urban roads as well as highways, you definitely are looking for a sedan. This category is undoubtedly one of the classiest categories of cars, be it for the eyes or driving. The Indian market is replete with cars from this category, both from Indian as well as foreign manufacturers. In this aspect, two cars, which have made an impact, are the Honda City and 2015 Hyundai 4S Fluidic Verna.

2015 Hyundai 4S Fluidic Verna Vs Honda City | CarTrade.com
Honda City

The Honda City is priced at 11.5 lakhs INR while the new Hyundai 4S Fluidic Verna is priced slightly higher at 12.2 lakhs INR. Honda City is powered by a 1498 cc 16V DOHC iDTEC Diesel Engine. It musters power of 98.6 bhp at the rate of 3600 rpm and a net torque of 200 Nm at the rate of 1750 rom. The Verna generates power from a 126.32 bhp at the rate of 4000 rpm from a 1582 cc 16V CRDI Diesel engine. The torque output for the car is 259.8 Nm at the rate of 1900-2750 rpm.

Hyundai 4S Fluidic Verna

While the City comes with a direct injection fuel supply, the new Hyundai model has been provided with CRDI system. Honda City comes with a six-speed transmission system, while Hyundai has been provided with a four-speed gearbox. Both the cars have been provided with a Four-Wheel Drive (FWD) option to make driving much easier on all types of roads. The only point of difference in the transmission system between the two cars is that Honda comes with a manual system and Hyundai has introduced automatic in its car.

The mileage is an important factor that determines the success of cars in the Indian market. Honda City has a mileage of 22 kilometres per litre on city roads whereas on highways, it is 25.1 kilometres per litre. The fuel tank capacity of the car is 40 litres. On the other hand, Hyundai Verna is capable of providing a mileage of 16.04 kilometres per litre on city road, while on highways; it rises up to 19.08 kilometres per litre.

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